Two Spirits, One Heart, Five Genders

“The New World.” This romanticized term inspired legions of Europeans to race to the places we live in search of freedoms from oppressive regimes or treasures that would be claimed in the name of some European nation.

two-spirits

two-spirits

The Europeans saw new geography, new plants, new animals, but the most perplexing curiosity to these people were the Original Peoples and our ways of life. Of all of the foreign life ways Indians held, one of the first the Europeans targeted for elimination was the Two Spirit tradition among Native American cultures. At the point of contact, all Native American societies acknowledged three to five gender roles: Female, male, Two Spirit female, Two Spirit male and transgendered. LGBT Native Americans wanting to be identified within their respective tribes and not grouped with other races officially adopted the term “Two Spirit” from the Ojibwe language in Winnipeg, Manitoba, 1989

Perhaps one of the most famous Two Spirits of the past was We’wha (1849-1896), of the Zuni nation. We’wha was biologically a male and engendered with a female spirit. By all accounts, she was a very intelligent person who became the Zuni Ambassador in Washington, D.C. and was celebrated by the Washington elite as “The Zuni man-woman.” This photo depicts We’wha in traditional Zuni female clothes.

Wewha

Wewha

Read the whole thing at link below

via Two Spirits, One Heart, Five GendersICTMN.com


 

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