Most Shared: 2016


  1. Uhura Barbie [50th Anniversary]
  2. Spock Barbie: Highly Logical
  3. Maya: Harlem Hopscotch
  4. #StopBullying Poster Series
  5. Muhammad Ali: Candid Camera and Kids
  6. Pooh, I feel you.
  7. Muhammad Ali: Obituary
  8. Coral Island Marine Park
  9. GoT:The Bastard Bowl Is On
  10. Favorite of 2015

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Cinema: 8th Street Playhouse


Eighth Street Movie Theatre, New York Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema 1929

Film Guild Cinema 1929

The Film Guild Cinema launched February 1, 1929 with “Two Days.” It was conceptualized by Symon Gould – one of two people along with Michael Mindlin commonly cited for the art film movement shown in decidedly non-palatial diminutive theater – and architected by Frederick Kiesler. His sketches including the four screen concept is in photos. On May 14, 1930, the theatre changed to the Eighth Street Playhouse. It announced just one month later that it would usher in early experimental television as part of its programming mission.

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GOOGLE: Boulle


Love that a search for Boulle will turn up the guy who wrote Planet of the Apes, a famous baroque furniture maker, and the genius architect—Google who says you don’t have a sense of humor?

Pshaw.

The Beautiful Madness of…


insane asylum plans

Insane Asylum Buffalo & Topeka Comparisons

Up to the 19th Century mentally ill people were sometimes chained naked in squalid conditions in places like London’s Bethlehem hospital which became synonymous with chaos (its name being contracted to bedlam) and where tourists would pay to see the freak show. Then came the extreme rationalism of the Kirkbride plan which created a very unusual form of architecture for asylums throughout the Anglosphere that was used until the 20th Century. As a result of their demise, most are abandoned ruins today, giant, rotting testimonies to a bygone era of clinical Victorian discipline combined with neo-Gothic extravagance. Continue reading

Bentham’s Panopticon


“…Foucault’s “critical philosophy” undermines such claims by exhibiting how they are just the outcome of contingent historical forces, and are not scientifically grounded truths.

Bentham’s Panopticon is, for Foucault, an ideal architectural model of modern disciplinary power. It is a design for a prison, built so that each inmate is separated from and invisible to all the others (in separate “cells”) and each inmate is always visible to a monitor situated in a central tower. Monitors will not in fact always see each inmate; the point is that they could at any time. Since inmates never know whether they are being observed, they must act as if they are always objects of observation. As a result, control is achieved more by the internal monitoring of those controlled than by heavy physical constraints.

Panopticon-prayers

Description: Jeremy Bentham’s panoptic prison design showing prisoner in cell kneeling towards central watch tower with altar on top Source: Prison design, not actually built (Foucault, 1975, p. 21) Date: 1840

The principle of the Panopticon can be applied not only to prisons but to any system of disciplinary power (a factory, a hospital, a school). And, in fact, although Bentham himself was never able to build it, its principle has come to pervade every aspect of modern society. It is the instrument through which modern discipline has replaced pre-modern sovereignty (kings, judges) as the fundamental power relation.”


via Excerpt from Foucault entry at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy