Julius Eastman: Femenine


He contained so much art and vision as to be a scene unto himself. Then he faded from view.

After alienating lovers and collaborators alike, Eastman was evicted from his apartment in the mid-’80s. Most of his scores were bagged and carted away—eventually lost to history. Details from his homeless period are sketchy (or contested), but it’s generally agreed that he lived in Tompkins Square Park and also suffered from some form of addiction. After he died, alone in a Buffalo hospital at age 49, it took eight months for an obituary to be published. Continue reading

Cinema: 8th Street Playhouse


Eighth Street Movie Theatre, New York Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema 1929

Film Guild Cinema 1929

The Film Guild Cinema launched February 1, 1929 with “Two Days.” It was conceptualized by Symon Gould – one of two people along with Michael Mindlin commonly cited for the art film movement shown in decidedly non-palatial diminutive theater – and architected by Frederick Kiesler. His sketches including the four screen concept is in photos. On May 14, 1930, the theatre changed to the Eighth Street Playhouse. It announced just one month later that it would usher in early experimental television as part of its programming mission.

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Artistic History > Corporate Hagiography


Crossroads of the (Art) World

Views of the Time Square Show (organized by Colab), 1980. Photo collage by Terise Slotkin

Views of the Time Square Show (organized by Colab), 1980. Photo collage by Terise Slotkin

With AIDS decimating the creative landscape, there was hardly a fight. The loss of a collectivized concept of art—at least as a mainstream process—is powerfully felt in the isolation of present-day artists, who for the most part are more willing to identify with previous generations than their own peers. It is a great victory for consumerism that even the most radical among us have chosen to filter ourselves through arts that have been authorized by corporate distribution.


via Crossroads of the (Art) World |Paris Review


 

Night Walk: Ken Schles


“I lay these fragments before you. What has since been rebuilt now reverts back to its former state of skeletal ruin. The dead reappear, hurry about and whisper their siren songs into your ear.”

 

 Ken Schles

(from the introduction of Night Walk)


Night Walk is dedicated to the memory of those who died in the scourge of AIDS and violence that gripped the East Village during the 1980s.


via Night Walk | Ken Schles on YouTube.