International Womens Day


“Girls have always been able to play out different roles and careers with Barbie and we are thrilled to shine a light on real life role models to remind them that they can be anything,” wrote Lisa McKnight, senior vice president and general manager of Barbie, in a news release.

#MoreRoleModels. #IWD2018

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Claudette Colvin Explains Her Role in the Civil Rights Movement 


[Rosa] Parks became an icon of resistance. Meanwhile, Colvin became an outcast, branded a troublemaker within her community after her initial arrest and conviction. She was abandoned by civil rights leaders when she became pregnant at 16. Although she has gained recognition in recent years — a book about her life won the National Book Award in 2009 — Colvin is still largely glossed over by history and her immense contribution and sacrifice has never been officially recognized by the U.S. government, as Parks was.

Claudette Colvin

Teen Vogue spoke with Colvin, now 78 years old, at her home in New York and by phone about her experiences.


Read the whole interview: Claudette Colvin Explains Her Role in the Civil Rights Movement | Teen Vogue


 

The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson


Movie Poster Death and Life of Marsha P Johnson

Academy Award® nominated director David France’s (How to Survive a Plague) new documentary centers on self-described “street queen” Marsha P. Johnson, legendary fixture in New York City’s gay ghetto, who along with fellow trans icon Sylvia Rivera, founded Street Transvestites Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.), a trans activist group based in the heart of NYC’s Greenwich Village. Mysteriously, Marsha was found floating in the Hudson River in 1992. At the time, the NYPD pegged her death as a suicide, a claim that Marsha’s comrades have always firmly rejected. Structured as a whodunit, with activist Victoria Cruz cast as detective and audience surrogate, The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson celebrates the lasting political legacy of Marsha P. Johnson, while seeking to finally solve the mystery of her unexplained death.

—Loren Hammonds

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Dance Culture=Social Progress


David Mancuso: DJ and dance culture pioneer, dies aged 72

‘The core idea behind The Loft is social progress’ … David Mancuso. Photograph: Allan Tannenbaum/Getty Images

Unlike the commercial clubs that existed to make a profit, Mancuso and particularly his event Love Saves the Day, offered a space for its members, often an LGBTQ audience, to celebrate nightlife without police interference.

“For me, the core [idea behind The Loft] is social progress,” he said in 2013. “How much social progress can there be when you’re in a situation that is repressive? You won’t get much social progress in a nightclub.


via David Mancuso, DJ and dance culture pioneer, dies aged 72 | The Guardian


 

NYC Developers May Destroy Original Keith Haring Mural 


Keith Haring Mural Baby

Further evidence that the city is intent on shaking off any sign of personality that could distinguish it from, say, a strip mall in Terre Haute, Indiana: An original Keith Haring mural from the early ’80s, which winds through the stairwells of a rental house in Morningside, is quite likely to be painted over in a bid to entice more monied tenants into the building. Continue reading

Zazu Nova


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@Regrann from @lgbt_history – Zazu Nova, Gay Liberation Front meeting, c. June 1970. Photo by Diana Davies, @nyplpicturecollection. Diana Davies, the pioneering photographer and archivist, misidentified the subject of this photo as Marsha P. Johnson, and it therefore has been cited for decades as an image of the legendary Ms. Johnson. During interviews with gay liberation veterans for his "The Gay Liberation Youth Movement in New York: An Army of Lovers Cannot Fail," however, Stephan Cohen correctly identified the subject as Zazu Nova, a founding member of New York's Gay Youth, the revolutionary group that gave voice to LGBT individuals between the ages of sixteen and twenty. Perry Brass, co-editor of "Come Out" magazine, later recalled "one Gay Liberation Front dance when [Nova] jumped in like a torpedo, and once on the dance floor unhooked [her] bra and threw it into the middle of the crowd. 'Now that's women's liberation!' one of my friends said." Marsha P. Johnson and Zazu Nova are among the many pioneering trans women of color that helped found the modern gay liberation movement. #lgbthistory #lgbtherstory #lgbttheirstory #lgbtpride #queerhistorymatters #haveprideinhistory #transisbeautiful #remembertheT #Regrann

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Jesse Williams BET awards show speech [full transcript]


“Peace. Peace. Thank you Debra. Thank you, Nate Parker. Thank you, Harry and Debbie Allen, for participating in that.

“Before we get into it, I just want to say I brought my parents out tonight — I just want to thank them for being here and teaching me to focus on comprehension over career. They made sure I learned what the schools were afraid to teach us. And also, thank you to my amazing wife for changing my life.

Jesse Williams BP salute-BET awards-comp

“Now, this award, this is not for me. This is for the real organizers all over the country. The activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do. All right? It’s kind of basic mathematics. The more we learn about who we are and how we got here, the more we will mobilize.

“Now, this is also in particular for the black women in particular who have spent their lifetimes dedicated to nurturing everyone before themselves. We can and will do better for you.

“Now, what we’ve been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to deescalate, disarm and not kill white people every day. So what’s going to happen is we’re going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function in ours.

“Now, [standing ovation] I got more, y’all.

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Capitalism and gay identity


The Stonewall uprising in New York City in June 1969 was the most immediate catalyst for the formation of the gay liberation movement. Before the end of the summer of 1969, the Gay Liberation Front had formed in the United States, and within the following year gay liberation groups sprang into existence across the country (D’Emilio 1983, 232-233). Gay liberation was itself an outcome of the adjustments of late capitalism that spawned the general international insurgency circa 1968. Most immediately, it was inspired by the black power movement and the rise of feminism — both of which included fractions that aimed to articulate the historical relationship between culture and class, local and global forces. Continue reading

I’m Gay and This Is Why You Should Care


I come from people burned at the stake, I come from people who were stoned, I come from men and women who were forced into loveless marriages, I come from hidden loves and love that dares not speak its name.  I come from Michelangelo and DaVinci and James Baldwin and Bayard Rustin and Alexander the Great.  Bessie Smith and Audre Lorde and Joan of Arc and Sappho and Lily Tomlin. I come from Rabbis who secretly wrote poems about how they wish they were born women and blues men who sang about having “sissy man” blues and berdaches, drag kings and drag queens. I am the burned out nightclub in New Orleans that left 43 dead, I am the Oscar Wilde going to jail and special ordering gay books by phone as a teenager, picnics at Roosevelt Island, kisses at the rain at the National Zoo, holding hands at an art museum, making dinner for his family, I am dancing at the gay club–and voguing–and walking runway and attempted death drops and blowing a whistle at 20, VIP at 25, dancing until I almost died at 39, making a happy fool out of myself at Pride.


via I’m Gay and This Is Why You Should Care | Afroculinaria