It’s Been Too Long Dahlings!


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Julius Eastman: Femenine


He contained so much art and vision as to be a scene unto himself. Then he faded from view.

After alienating lovers and collaborators alike, Eastman was evicted from his apartment in the mid-’80s. Most of his scores were bagged and carted away—eventually lost to history. Details from his homeless period are sketchy (or contested), but it’s generally agreed that he lived in Tompkins Square Park and also suffered from some form of addiction. After he died, alone in a Buffalo hospital at age 49, it took eight months for an obituary to be published. Continue reading

Cinema: 8th Street Playhouse


Eighth Street Movie Theatre, New York Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema 1929

Film Guild Cinema 1929

The Film Guild Cinema launched February 1, 1929 with “Two Days.” It was conceptualized by Symon Gould – one of two people along with Michael Mindlin commonly cited for the art film movement shown in decidedly non-palatial diminutive theater – and architected by Frederick Kiesler. His sketches including the four screen concept is in photos. On May 14, 1930, the theatre changed to the Eighth Street Playhouse. It announced just one month later that it would usher in early experimental television as part of its programming mission.

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ART we LIKE: Martin Puryear



Martin Puryear’s sculptures—in wood, stone, tar, wire, and various metals—are a marriage of Minimalist logic with traditional ways of making. Puryear’s exploration in abstract forms retain vestigial elements of utility from everyday objects found in the world. A form that reoccurs in Puryear’s work is the hollow mass, a solid shape with qualities of uncertainty and emptiness.