Citizen of the Year


2017 Citizen of the Year

Much has changed in the four years since Colin Kaepernick was last on the cover of GQ. Back then he was a rippling superhero of a quarterback on the rise. But a simple act—kneeling during the national anthem—changed everything. It cost him his job. It also transformed Colin Kaepernick into a lightning rod and a powerful symbol of activism and resistance.

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Claudette Colvin Explains Her Role in the Civil Rights Movement 


[Rosa] Parks became an icon of resistance. Meanwhile, Colvin became an outcast, branded a troublemaker within her community after her initial arrest and conviction. She was abandoned by civil rights leaders when she became pregnant at 16. Although she has gained recognition in recent years — a book about her life won the National Book Award in 2009 — Colvin is still largely glossed over by history and her immense contribution and sacrifice has never been officially recognized by the U.S. government, as Parks was.

Claudette Colvin

Teen Vogue spoke with Colvin, now 78 years old, at her home in New York and by phone about her experiences.


Read the whole interview: Claudette Colvin Explains Her Role in the Civil Rights Movement | Teen Vogue


 

Web of Life


This we know:

Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons of the earth. Man did not weave the web of life; he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself. Continue to contaminate your bed and you will one night suffocate in your own waste.

—Chief Stealth, 1854

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While You Slept: #NoDAPL


( Click any picture above to see full-size or scroll through )


Last Night while you watched TV, hugged your loved ones, tucked your kids in, the Water Protectors at Standing Rock were pelted with rubber bullets, had tear gas fired on them, and then in freezing temperatures had Water Cannons blasted on them. Continue reading

FOUCAULT: Main Danger


“ 

My point is not that everything is bad, but that everything is dangerous, which is not exactly the same as bad. If everything is dangerous, then we always have something to do. So my position leads not to apathy but to a hyper- and pessimistic activism. I think that the ethico-political choice we have to make every day is to determine which is the main danger.

— Michel Foucault

On the Genealogy of Ethics: An Overview of Work in Progress

Afterword, in Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow, Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Massachusetts Press. (1983)

Race Riots


This is the day in 1935 on 125th Street in Harlem the phrase changed. Up until that point it had been anchored to a different meaning, and the one that some eighty years later we still hear being used in places like Ferguson & with the Baltimore Uprising.

$35,302,238.80,in damages by today’s standard (est. 2 million in 1935)
3 lives lost, hundreds injured in a full day of mayhem.

The Riot in Harlem of 1935 changed the paradigm. While its roots & causes were as the commission found afterwards deeply rooted in the very same issues and created a whole new usage of the term which was outlined by the sociologist Alan D. Grimshaw to proclaim the modern form of racial rioting:

  1. “violence directed almost entirely against property”
  2. “the absence of clashes between racial groups”
  3. “struggles between the lower-class Negro population and the police forces”

Later the eminent philosopher would state:

“the Negro is not merely the man who shouldn’t be forgotten; he is the man who cannot safely be ignored.”

— Alain Locke