Prince’s Women and Me


 

Molly Crabapple Prince Women

Prince’s Women and Me: The Collaborators Who Inspired a Generation

I considered all these women from my particular vantage point, a place America hadn’t discovered yet, a land of women whose girls reluctantly lived with the shorthand descriptive “exotic” because nobody had bothered to look into them yet. Unlike Prince. Between 1984 and 1992, my coming-of-age years, he put out an album a year, all of them with women front and center, not to mention women whose visual identities pressed up against the boundaries of race, gender, and sexuality — sometimes all at once. (click illustration or link above to read more)


Illustration via Molly Crabapple (@mollycrabapple) | Twitter


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PoC in Fantasy Franchises


Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential.

— Junot Díaz

 (FanBros, “The Junot Díaz Episode”)